SWOV Catalogus

74608

THE SCOPE AND NATURE OF THE DROWSY DRIVING PROBLEM IN NEW YORK STATE.
I 882626 IRRD 9808 /83 /
MCCARTT, A.T. RIBNER, S.A. PACK, A.I. & HAMMER, M.C.
ACCIDENT ANALYSIS AND PREVENTION. 1996 /07. 28(4) PP511-7 (14 REFS.) ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD, BAMPFYLDE STREET, EXETER, EX1 2AH, UNITED KINGDOM 1996

Samenvatting A telephone survey was conducted of a random sample of New York State licensed drivers to determine the prevalence and circumstances of drowsy driving. Based on the survey responses, 54.6% of the drivers had driven while drowsy within the past year, 22.6% had ever fallen asleep at the wheel without having a crash, 2.8% had ever crashed when they fell asleep, and 1.9% had crashed when driving while drowsy. Of the reported crashes due to driving while drowsy or falling asleep at the wheel, 82.5% involved the driver alone in the vehicle, 60.0% occurred between 11:00 p.m. and 7:00 a.m., 47.5% were drive-off-road crashes, and 40.0% occurred on a highway or expressway. Multiple regression analysis suggested that the following driver variables are predictive of an increased frequency of driving drowsy: demographic characteristics (younger drivers, more education, and men); sleep patterns (fewer hours of sleep at night and greater frequency of trouble staying awake during the day); work patterns (greater frequency of driving for job and working rotating shifts); and driving patterns (greater number of miles driven annually and fewer number of hours a person can drive before becoming drowsy. (A) This article is published in the proceedings of the 39th annual meeting of the Association for the Advancement of Automotive Medicine (AAAM), held Chicago October 16-18, 1995 pp 467-482, and for the abstract see IRRD 880053.
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