SWOV Catalogus

333656

Safety implications of infotainment system use in naturalistic driving. Paper presented at IEA 2012, 18th World congress on Ergonomics : designing a sustainable future, held in Recife, Brazil, February 12-16, 2012.
20120339 ST [electronic version only]
Perez, M.A.
Work: A Journal of Prevention, Assessment and Rehabilitation, Vol. 41 (2012), Supplement 1 'Proceedings of IEA 2012, 18th World congress on Ergonomics : designing a sustainable future, held in Recife, Brazil, February 12-16, 2012', p. 4200-4204, 13 ref.

Samenvatting The use of a radio while driving has long been considered a “threshold” of distraction that is socially acceptable although it may be a factor in some crashes and near crashes. This “social acceptance” has prompted the use of radio tasks, specifically radio tuning, as “references” that should not be exceeded by other secondary and tertiary tasks that make their way into the vehicle. As new functions make their way into vehicle radios (or more advanced infotainment systems), however, it is possible that radio tasks may become distracting to a level that surpasses current driver expectations. This investigation examines the naturalistic usage of several advanced infotainment systems and examines whether usage is associated first with changes in near crash occurrence and second with changes in driving behaviour. Little association was found with near crashes: 5 of 46 near crash events observed in the dataset exhibited infotainment system use. Drivers involved in infotainment system use during near crashes, however, did exhibit distinct glance behaviours, generally suggesting lower levels of awareness about their driving environment. Initial analyses of a larger dataset appear to confirm these findings. (Author/publisher)
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